Four macro trends will shape urban life in the 21st century. This thesis group operates in the space between.


We are exploring how deep computation may be utilized to enable the creation of new institutions, or to help old ones thrive in imaginative ways. The projects examine what we share in cities, how, and why.




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Each illustrates how the efficiencies of automation might be applied toward outcomes such as wellbeing, resilience, or equity. The projects are not startup pitches, but instead implicate the role of cooperatives and government.




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While traditional architectural concerns of form and material are important, the student projects each describe a system or service and then show how it is rendered plausible and effective in the city.

This work follows research including horizon scanning of autonomous vehicles in the Fall semester, tracing out the potentialities and limits of computation.




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Students were free to explore their own interests and four clusters emerged.






Place

What might automation mean for the space of streets, parks, and urban markets?

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View the projects


Health

Where will healthcare happen in cities with a greater level of automation?

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Deliveries & Logistics

What new spatial problems and opportunities related to the movement of goods emerge after automation?

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Institutions

How does automation change the way labor, energy, and religion are spatialized in the city?

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View the projects



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Civic Futures Thesis Group 2019-2020




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Thank you to our Guest Critics Throughout the Year